Tag Archives: fintech

the us capitol

Letters to Congress: Letter to Congress Regarding Google’s Entrance into Digital Asset Markets

We, the undersigned organizations, write to you as advocates of transparency in digital asset markets. The cryptocurrency market boom has led to large corporations investing in the field, including Facebook (now Meta), whose problematic “Libra” cryptocurrency proposal was scrutinized in a 2019 hearing held by the Committee, at your direction. Facebook has since abandoned the project in light of the concerns raised at this hearing and due to push back from policymakers, public interest organizations, and financial regulators. 

sign for the CFPB outside a building

Letters to Regulators: Letter Urging CFPB Oversight of New Products like Buy Now, Pay Later (BNPL) Loans, Income Share Agreements, Cash Advances, “Fintech” Overdraft or Overdraft Avoidance Products, and Earned Wage Access Products or Look-Alike Products

AFREF joined a letter urging CFPB oversight of new products like buy now, pay later (BNPL) loans, income share agreements, cash advances, “fintech” overdraft or overdraft avoidance products, and earned wage access products or look-alike products that are evading consumer protection laws and creating debt traps for consumers. The letter states that the CFPB should supervise providers and ensure that each of these products are complying with applicable consumer protection laws.

Testimony: License to Bank – Examining the Legal Framework Governing Who Can Lend and Process Payments in the Fintech Age

What industry calls “innovation” is often easily mapped to a longstanding financial service and therefore the existing laws should apply. At the same time, certain tools and certain forms of partnerships should have no place in our economy whatsoever. Treating innovation as an unqualified good leads regulators to ignore both considerations of equity and long-term, sustainable innovation. Give the interface between powerful corporations, complex products, and the public, precaution should be the norm, as it is in food and drug regulation.

FACT SHEET: Banking on Surveillance: The Libra Black Paper

Because Faceboook’s active-user network alone represents more than a third of the global population, its ambitions raise the spectre of systemic risk not only in the United States, but across jurisdictional lines. Indeed, a global stablecoin system like the Libra project could pose especially substantial risks to certain developing economies, where Libra Coins could functionally replace the local currency.